Food, Femininity, and Feminism in American Culture from Amelia Simmons to Martha Stewart

Dublin Core

Title

Food, Femininity, and Feminism in American Culture from Amelia Simmons to Martha Stewart

Subject

Women's Studies, History, Food Studies

Description

This course considers the ways in which the production and consumption of food fundamentally shaped concepts of femininity and feminism in American culture. Beginning with Amelia Simmons’s publication of American Cookery in 1796, considered the first American cookbook, and continuing to the present day students will explore women’s relationships with food as housekeepers, caretakers, social activists, servants, career women, and more. Through readings drawn from primary historical sources, scholarly secondary materials, and contemporary journalistic pieces along with films related to current issues around food, students will critically consider how women’s associations with food served to both oppress and empower them as well as the differences between the prescriptive ideal and lived experience.

Creator

Rachel A. Snell

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Date

2017

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Rights

Copyright Rachel A. Snell 2017

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Citation

Rachel A. Snell, “Food, Femininity, and Feminism in American Culture from Amelia Simmons to Martha Stewart,” Recipes as Sources for Women's Lives, accessed November 20, 2017, http://foodfemin2017.omeka.net/items/show/4.